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Grayson Baker
Grayson Baker

Learn BPMN Modeling with Bruce Silver's Method and Style and PDF Creator Tools



H1 Bruce Silver BPMN Method and Style PDF Creator --- --- H2 Introduction H3 What is BPMN? H3 What is Bruce Silver's method and style? H3 Why use a PDF creator for BPMN diagrams? H2 How to use Bruce Silver's method and style H3 Level 1: Descriptive BPMN H4 Basic shapes and symbols H4 Process logic and hierarchy H3 Level 2: Analytic BPMN H4 Event-triggered behavior and exception handling H4 Process performance and quality improvement H3 Level 3: Executable BPMN H4 XML representation of BPMN diagrams H4 Process automation using BPMN engines H2 Conclusion H3 Summary of main points H3 Benefits of using Bruce Silver's method and style H3 Call to action And here is the article I wrote based on the outline: # Bruce Silver BPMN Method and Style PDF Creator ## Introduction Business process modeling is a technique for capturing, analyzing, and improving the way an organization operates. It involves creating diagrams that represent the activities, events, data, and decisions involved in a business process. Business process modeling can help organizations to: - Understand how their processes work and how they can be improved - Communicate and collaborate effectively across different roles and departments - Align their processes with their strategic goals and customer needs - Automate their processes using software tools and platforms One of the most widely used standards for business process modeling is Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN). BPMN is a graphical language that allows business users and technical experts to create and share process models using a common notation. BPMN has a rich set of shapes and symbols that can express various aspects of a process, such as activities, events, gateways, flows, pools, lanes, and artifacts. However, creating effective process models using BPMN requires more than just knowing the meaning of the shapes and symbols. It also requires a methodology for translating the process logic into the diagram in a consistent and clear way. And it requires a style that ensures that the process model is unambiguous and understandable from the diagram alone. One of the most popular and influential methodologies for BPMN modeling is Bruce Silver's method and style. Bruce Silver is a leading expert and author on BPMN, who has developed a levels-based approach for creating process models that are correct, complete, and clear. His method and style is based on a set of best practices and conventions that guide the modeler through the steps of creating a BPMN diagram, from defining the scope and structure of the process to adding the details and annotations. One of the benefits of using Bruce Silver's method and style is that it allows the modeler to create process models that can be easily converted into PDF documents. A PDF document is a file format that preserves the layout, formatting, and appearance of a document across different devices and platforms. A PDF document can be viewed, printed, shared, and stored without losing any information or quality. Using a PDF creator for BPMN diagrams can help organizations to: - Document their processes in a standard and portable format - Protect their intellectual property and prevent unauthorized changes - Comply with regulatory requirements and audit trails - Enhance their communication and collaboration with stakeholders - Archive their processes for future reference and reuse In this article, we will explain how to use Bruce Silver's method and style to create BPMN diagrams that can be easily converted into PDF documents using a PDF creator tool. We will cover the three levels of BPMN modeling that Bruce Silver defines in his methodology: descriptive, analytic, and executable. We will also provide some examples of BPMN diagrams created using his method and style. ## How to use Bruce Silver's method and style Bruce Silver's method and style is based on the idea that BPMN modeling should be done in three levels, each with its own purpose, audience, and notation. The three levels are: - Level 1: Descriptive BPMN - Level 2: Analytic BPMN - Level 3: Executable BPMN ### Level 1: Descriptive BPMN Level 1 is the basic level of BPMN modeling that is suitable for business users who want to create simple process maps. Level 1 uses a subset of BPMN shapes and symbols that are mostly derived from traditional flowcharting. Level 1 focuses on describing the sequence of activities and the roles involved in a process, without going into the details of events, exceptions, and data. #### Basic shapes and symbols The basic shapes and symbols that are used in level 1 BPMN modeling are: - Activities: Activities represent the work that is done in a process. They can be tasks (atomic units of work) or subprocesses (nested processes that can be expanded or collapsed). Activities are shown as rounded rectangles with a label inside. - Events: Events represent things that happen in a process, such as triggers, outcomes, or messages. Events are shown as circles with different icons inside to indicate their type and behavior. In level 1, only two types of events are used: start events (indicated by a single thin border) and end events (indicated by a single thick border). - Gateways: Gateways represent branching points in a process, where the flow can split or merge based on conditions or choices. Gateways are shown as diamonds with different icons inside to indicate their type and logic. In level 1, only two types of gateways are used: exclusive gateways (indicated by an X) and parallel gateways (indicated by a plus sign). - Flows: Flows represent the connections between the elements in a process. They can be sequence flows (solid lines with an arrowhead) or message flows (dashed lines with an envelope icon and an arrowhead). Sequence flows show the order of execution of the elements, while message flows show the exchange of information between different participants or systems. - Pools and lanes: Pools and lanes represent the participants or roles involved in a process. Pools are rectangular containers that can be divided into horizontal or vertical lanes to show different sub-participants or sub-roles. Pools and lanes have labels on their headers to indicate their names. #### Process logic and hierarchy The process logic and hierarchy in level 1 BPMN modeling are based on the following principles: - A process model should have one start event and one end event per pool. The start event indicates where the process begins, and the end event indicates where the process ends. Multiple start events or end events per pool are not allowed in level 1. - A process model should have a clear and consistent flow direction. The flow direction is usually from left to right or from top to bottom, depending on the orientation of the pool. The flow direction should not change or cross within the same pool. - A process model should have a balanced number of incoming and outgoing flows for each element. Each element should have at least one incoming flow and one outgoing flow, except for start events (which have no incoming flows) and end events (which have no outgoing flows). The number of incoming and outgoing flows should match the type and logic of the element. - A process model should have a hierarchical structure that reflects the level of detail and abstraction of the process. A process model can be composed of multiple levels of subprocesses, each with its own start event, end event, and flow direction. A subprocess can be collapsed (shown as a single activity with a plus sign in the bottom center) or expanded (shown as a separate pool with its own elements and flows). Here is an example of a level 1 BPMN diagram that shows a simple order fulfillment process: ![Level 1 BPMN diagram](https://methodandstyle.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Level1.png) ### Level 2: Analytic BPMN Level 2 is the advanced level of BPMN modeling that is suitable for business analysts and architects who want to create detailed process models that can support analysis and improvement. Level 2 expands the notation of level 1 to include more shapes and symbols that can express event-triggered behavior, exception handling, data manipulation, and annotations. #### Event-triggered behavior and exception handling The event-triggered behavior and exception handling in level 2 BPMN modeling are based on the following principles: - A process model can have multiple types of intermediate events that can occur during the execution of an activity or a subprocess. Intermediate events are shown as circles with double borders and different icons inside to indicate their type and behavior. Some common types of intermediate events are timer events (indicated by a clock), message events (indicated by an envelope), error events (indicated by a bolt), escalation events (indicated by an up arrow), compensation events (indicated by two left arrows), signal events (indicated by a triangle), link events (indicated by an arrow), cancel events (indicated by an X), conditional events (indicated by a pentagon), and terminate events (indicated by a solid circle). - A process model can have different ways of attaching intermediate events to activities or subprocesses, depending on how they affect the BPMN to include more shapes and symbols that can express the technical details and specifications of a process, such as data inputs and outputs, service tasks, script tasks, business rules tasks, etc. Level 3 also uses an XML representation of BPMN diagrams that can be interpreted and executed by a BPMN engine or platform. #### XML representation of BPMN diagrams The XML representation of BPMN diagrams in level 3 BPMN modeling is based on the following principles: - A BPMN diagram is an XML document that conforms to the BPMN 2.0 schema defined by the OMG. The XML document contains the definitions element as the root element, which can contain one or more process elements that represent the process models. Each process element can contain various elements that represent the shapes and symbols of the BPMN diagram, such as activities, events, gateways, flows, pools, lanes, data objects, artifacts, etc. - A BPMN element in the XML document has an id attribute that uniquely identifies it within the document. The id attribute is required for all elements that can be referenced by other elements, such as activities, events, gateways, flows, data objects, etc. The id attribute can also be used to map the XML element to the graphical element in the diagram. - A BPMN element in the XML document can have various attributes and child elements that specify its properties and behavior. For example, an activity element can have attributes such as name, isForCompensation, startQuantity, completionQuantity, etc., and child elements such as documentation, ioSpecification, dataInputAssociation, dataOutputAssociation, loopCharacteristics, multiInstanceLoopCharacteristics, etc. - A BPMN element in the XML document can also have extension elements that provide additional information or functionality that are not defined by the standard BPMN schema. Extension elements are usually specific to a particular BPMN engine or platform that supports them. For example, a serviceTask element can have an extension element called flowable:class that specifies the Java class that implements the service task logic. Here is an example of a level 3 BPMN diagram and its corresponding XML representation: ![Level 3 BPMN diagram](https://docs.camunda.io/docs/components/modeler/bpmn/bpmn-primer/loan-approval.png) ```xml




flow1









flow1


flow2


flow3







flow2


flow4




(income / 2)]]>




flow3


flow5




flow4





flow5





``` #### Process automation using BPMN engines The process automation using BPMN engines in level 3 BPMN modeling is based on the following principles: - A BPMN engine is a software platform or system that can parse, deploy, execute, and manage BPMN processes. A BPMN engine can also provide various features and services to support the process automation, such as user interface, task management, process monitoring, process analytics, etc. - A BPMN process can be deployed to a BPMN engine as an XML document or as a packaged file that contains the XML document and other resources, such as images, forms, scripts, etc. The BPMN engine will validate the XML document against the BPMN schema and store it in a repository for future execution. - A BPMN process can be executed by a BPMN engine as a process instance that represents a single execution of the process. A process instance can have various states, such as running, completed, suspended, terminated, etc. A process instance can also have various variables that store the data and information related to the process execution. - A BPMN process can be managed by a BPMN engine through various operations, such as starting, stopping, resuming, canceling, deleting, etc. A BPMN engine can also provide various APIs and interfaces to interact with the process instances and their elements, such as activities, events, gateways, flows, data objects, etc. Here is an example of how to deploy and execute a level 3 BPMN process using Flowable BPMN engine: ```java // Create a Flowable ProcessEngine object ProcessEngine processEngine = ProcessEngineConfiguration.createStandaloneInMemProcessEngineConfiguration().buildProcessEngine(); // Deploy the loanApproval.bpmn20.xml file to the ProcessEngine Deployment deployment = processEngine.getRepositoryService().createDeployment().addClasspathResource("loanApproval.bpmn20.xml").deploy(); // Start a new process instance of the loanApproval process ProcessInstance processInstance = processEngine.getRuntimeService().startProcessInstanceByKey("loanApproval"); // Get the current activity id of the process instance String activityId = processInstance.getActivityId(); // "startEvent" // Get the current task of the process instance Task task = processEngine.getTaskService().createTaskQuery().processInstanceId(processInstance.getId()).singleResult(); // null // Set some variables for the start event form Map variables = new HashMap(); variables.put("loanAmount", 1000); variables.put("income", 2000); // Submit the start event form with the variables processEngine.getRuntimeService().trigger(processInstance.getId(), variables); // Get the current activity id of the process instance activityId = processInstance.getActivityId(); // "decision" // Get the current task of the process instance task = processEngine.getTaskService().createTaskQuery().processInstanceId(processInstance.getId()).singleResult(); // "Approve Loan" // Complete the approve loan task processEngine.getTaskService().complete(task.getId()); // Get the current activity id of the process instance activityId = processInstance.getActivityId(); // null // Get the current task of the process instance task = processEngine.getTaskService().createTaskQuery().processInstanceId(processInstance.getId()).singleResult(); // null // Check if the process instance is ended boolean isEnded = processInstance.isEnded(); // true ``` ## Conclusion In this article, we have explained how to use Bruce Silver's method and style to create BPMN diagrams that can be easily converted into PDF documents using a PDF creator tool. We have covered the three levels of BPMN modeling that Bruce Silver defines in his methodology: descriptive, analytic, and executable. We have also provided some examples of BPMN diagrams created using his method and style. We hope that this article has helped you to understand and appreciate the value of using Bruce Silver's method and style for BPMN modeling. By following his best practices and conventions, you can create clear and consistent process models that can communicate effectively with different stakeholders and support various purposes and goals. If you want to learn more about Bruce Silver's method and style, you can visit his website [Method and Style](https://methodandstyle.com/) or read his book [BPMN Method and Style](https://www.amazon.com/BPMN-Method-Style-2nd-Implementation/dp/0982368119). If you want to try out a PDF creator tool for BPMN diagrams, you can check out [PDF Creator Online](https://pdfcreatoronline.com/), which allows you to upload your BPMN diagrams and convert them into PDF documents in seconds. ## FAQs Q: What is BPMN? A: BPMN stands for Business Process Model and Notation, which is a standard graphical language for modeling business processes. Q: What is Bruce Silver's method and style? A: Bruce Silver's method and style is a methodology for creating BPMN diagrams that are correct, complete, and clear. It is based on a set of best practices and conventions that guide the modeler through the steps of creating a BPMN diagram. Q: What are the three levels of BPMN modeling? A: The three levels of BPMN modeling are: - Level 1: Descriptive BPMN, which is suitable for business users who want to create simple process maps. - Level 2: Analytic BPMN, which is suitable for business analysts and architects who want to create detailed process models that can support analysis and improvement. - Level 3: Executable BPMN, which is suitable for developers and engineers who want to create executable process models that can be deployed to a software platform or engine. Q: Why use a PDF creator for BPMN diagrams? A: A PDF creator for BPMN diagrams can help organizations to: - Document their processes in a standard and portable format - Protect their intellectual property and prevent unauthorized changes - Comply with regulatory requirements and audit trails - Enhance their communication and collaboration with stakeholders - Archive their processes for future reference and reuse Q: How to use a PDF creator for BPMN diagrams? A: To use a PDF creator for BPMN diagrams, you need to: - Create your BPMN diagrams using a modeling tool that supports Bruce Silver's method and style - Upload your BPMN diagrams to the PDF creator tool - Choose the options and settings for th


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